Ashes Of Nora May French Will Be Cast Into The Ocean Tomorrow

Anon

Body of Poet to be Cremated in the City Today
Was Engaged to Marry Capt. Hiley, War Hero
Funeral Rite Will Be Held at Cypress Point

The body of Nora May French, the poet, who committed suicide Thursday at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. George Sterling at Carmel, will be brought to San Francisco today and cremated. The ashes will be taken to Carmel tomorrow, and her father and her sister, Miss Helen French, and a number of intimate friends of the deceased will gather at Cypress Point and cast the ashes into the waves that beat upon that promontory. The shade of the old oak there, the favorite of painters and poets, was one of her places for contemplation. During the two weeks that she lived at Carmel she often rode to the point, and, resting there, brooded for hours at a time— and no doubt worked out at that place the details of the act that gave sorrow to her friends and robbed the world of a talented woman.

Only those who knew her best will gather at the old cypress tomorrow and there will be little ceremony and no ostentation about the giving of her ashes to the ocean. Short and simple rites will mark the act which is to make her part of the sea and the shore by which she sat and planned this consummation,

Engaged to War Hero.

While in San Francisco Miss French was one of the literary group that lived in the neighborhood of Telegraph hill and frequented the resorts of the Latin quarter. It has been stated that she was betrothed to Henry A. Lafler, a local writer of more or less note, whose divorce suit is still pending in the courts. There was no truth in this report, however. Miss French was engaged to Thomas Allen Hiley, an Englishman, who had had an adventurous career. Captain Hiley lives a rather secluded life on a romantic little spot near the Big Trees. He makes few acquaintances and his life history, surrounded somewhat in a cloud of mystery, is known by but two or three persons in Santa Cruz. They have little to say and are not disposed to disclose many facts.

The San Francisco Call, Volume CII, No. 169. November 16th, 1907